Der Artikel ist weiterhin als ^^OTHERCONDITION^^ verfügbar.
Autor: Louis Begley
ISBN-13: 9780345530530
Einband: Taschenbuch
Seiten: 400
Gewicht: 304 g
Format: 202x131x27 mm
Sprache: Englisch
Erscheinungsdatum: 21.05.2013

Schmidt Steps Back

 Taschenbuch
Sofort lieferbar  |
 Lieferzeit: 3-5 Tage  
Unser bisheriger Preis: 14,00 €
Jetzt 12,68 €

Alle Preise inkl. MwSt.
| zzgl. Versand
2
Full of dark humor, compassion, and heart, Schmidt Steps Back is the most emotionally nuanced Schmidt novel yet.
3
"Tragic and redemptive . . . Updike had Rabbit, Roth has Zuckerman, Richard Ford has Bascombe and Begley has Schmidt. . . . [Schmidt Steps Back] is the most ambitious novel [yet] in the Schmidt cycle."-Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
Full of dark humor, compassion, and heart, Schmidt Steps Back is the most romantic installment yet of the drama that began with the acclaimed About Schmidt. Now seventy-eight, and just as passionate, sharp, and endearingly prickly as ever, Albert Schmidt faces a life alone, with only the crumbs of grandfatherly status and a less-than-demanding position at an international organization to sustain him. His only hope is Alice Verplanck, the French widow of a former partner, as elusive as she is beautiful. Whether his rusty seduction skills can lure her from Paris to the Hamptons won't be known, though, until Schmidt endures one more ordeal by fire. Hilarious, engrossing, and deeply poignant, Schmidt Steps Back is Louis Begley's finest novel yet.

Look for special features inside. Join the Random House Reader's Circle for author chats and more.

Praise for Schmidt Steps Back

"Engaging . . . Begley gets as close to Schmidt as a diarist, inhabiting this man who has been seasoned by a long life."-The New York Times Book Review

"Begley gets inside Schmidt's fertile WASP brain . . . with subtlety, intelligence, and wit."-The Philadelphia Inquirer

"The novel grows in Begley's excellent intricacy . . . to the level of art rather than manners. . . . One cannot read one of the Schmidt novels without laughing."-San Francisco Chronicle

"Thoroughly absorbing . . . [a] cause for celebration."-Salon

"[A] superb tragicomedy . . . seductive, subversive, and commanding."-Booklist (starred review)
Autor: Louis Begley
Louis Begley wurde am 6. Oktober 1933 unter dem Namen Ludwik Begleiter als Sohn polnischer Juden in einer kleinen Stadt im Osten Polens (heute Ukraine) geboren. Er selbst und seine Mutter entgingen, als katholische Polen getarnt, dem Holocaust. Nach dem Ende des Krieges kam die Familie wieder zusammen. Vier Monate blieben sie in Paris, wo Vater und Sohn Englisch lernten. Im März 1947 siedelte die Familie Begleiter in die USA über und ließ sich in Flatbush/Brooklyn nieder, wo sie den Namen Begley annahm.1950 erhielt Louis Begley ein Harvard-College-Stipendium und wurde damit zum Harvard College zugelassen; 1954 legte er sein Examen in Englischer Literatur ab. Von 1956 bis 1959 studierte er an der Harvard Law School und arbeitete im Anschluss bis zum Jahr 2004 als Anwalt in der Kanzlei Debevoise & Plimpton. Ende der sechziger Jahre arbeitete er bei der französischen Niederlassung von Debevoise in Paris. 1991 legte Louis Begley seinen ersten Roman vor. Seine Werke wurden in 15 Sprachen übersetzt und vielfach ausgezeichnet. Louis Begley lebt in New York.
I

New Year's Eve, eight o'clock in the morning. Sixteen more hours until the end of another shitty year of a shitty decade. What would the year ahead bring? For the nation that had-unbelievably, miraculously-overcome its history and was sending Barack Obama to the White House, Schmidt hoped it would bring redemption and cleansing. He was caught off guard by the tears that filled his eyes with the sleeve of his parka to wipe away. Sweet tears of pride. Was there anyone, he wondered, outside Obama's family, of course, whose affection for the man was as great and as pure as Schmidt's? He dared to think there wasn't: his feelings for this extraordinary young man transcended partisan politics. They had little or nothing to do, he thought, with his having backed the Democratic ticket in national elections ever since Adlai Stevenson's second run for the presidency. The first time around, he had been too young to vote, but in 1956, realizing that Ike was going to win, he cast his vote against him out of principle and also for the fun of exasperating his father, who had adopted the reactionary convictions of his Greek shipowner clients along with their taste for custom-made shoes and suits. No, this love-why not use that word?-for Obama existed on an altogether different level, melding with Schmidt's love for his country. Schmidt had another, more personal reason to rejoice: the hope that the curse he had laid upon himself thirteen years ago-a curse compounded of all the worst in him: jealousy and its cognate envy, blind pride, and quick unforgiving anger-had been conjured. Perhaps there was a better time ahead for him as well.

He picked up the New York Times at the beginning of the driveway, walked back to the house, and before going in checked the thermometer on the front porch. A chilly twenty-five degrees. With luck, by late morning it would be noticeably warmer, a good thing, inasmuch as he wanted Alice's adjustment to the caprices of Eastern Seaboard weather to be a gradual one. Four days earlier, the temperature had risen to an astonishing fifty-eight degrees, a record Schmidt had read in the Times. Christmas Day had been a cooler but still ludicrously balmy fifty-four degrees. According to the Times's weather forecast, the pendulum would swing all the way back on the first day of 2009: low of ten, high of twenty-five. He deposited the newspaper on the kitchen table and went out again for his ritual morning inspection of the property. Sonia would be arriving in a few minutes to put his breakfast on the table. It was an unnecessary task-he was quite capable of preparing his own breakfast-but there was so little work in the house these days that, believing firmly that nothing demoralizes staff as quickly as idleness, he felt pressed to find things for her to do. The big snow-more than five inches-dumped on Bridgehampton in the space of a few hours the week before Christmas had melted in the warm weather, reviving the grass. It sparkled green as in early June. Everything else looked good too, especially the azalea and rhododendron on the far edge of the back lawn. Somehow the marauding deer had spared them, even without the usual protective black nylon netting he had instructed Gus Parrish not to use. When the gardener, taken aback, had asked why, Schmidt heard himself admit the embarrassing truth: the netting made the bushes look to him like prehistoric beasts poised to advance on the house. The sight made him uneasy. It was Schmidt's turn to be surprised when Gus acceded to the wish without the least indication of thinking his client had gone bonkers. Such discretion was cause once again for Schmidt to congratulate himself on having hired Gus's outfit to take over when Jim Bogard's nephew finally followed his uncle into retirement. All told, the Bogards had looked after the property since before it had passed to Schmidt, when it still belonged to Mary's aunt Martha, and he and Mary, his late wife, and their daughter

Zu diesem Artikel ist noch keine Rezension vorhanden.
Helfen sie anderen Besuchern und verfassen Sie selbst eine Rezension.

 

Rezensionen

Autor: Louis Begley
ISBN-13:: 9780345530530
ISBN: 0345530535
Erscheinungsjahr: 21.05.2013
Verlag: Random House LCC US
Gewicht: 304g
Seiten: 400
Sprache: Englisch
Sonstiges: Taschenbuch, 202x131x27 mm